When You Wish Upon A Star
Childrens classics to jazz standards
Thu, Aug 5, 8:00 - 9:15 pm
Jaqua Concert Hall, The Shedd Institute
Full City Coffee Roasters
Concert Sponsor
By the mid-1930s animated film was a well-established feature of American popular culture, with several companies putting out wonderful comic and musical shorts in a variety of styles designed for general motion picture audiences to enjoy before the main feature. Max Fleischer Studios struck a decidedly adult tone with Koko the Clown, Bimbo, Betty Boop and their series of hip, jazzy, markedly sexy and often surreal cartoons: even retellings of children’s classics were pretty weird (Fleischer’s 1933 Snow-White is downright creepy!). Warner Brothers and their omnipresent Looney Tunes targeted just about everyone, as did Walt Disney’s own early ‘30s output, featuring the wildly popular Mickey Mouse and his gang. But when the film industry began cleaning itself up with the Hays Code of 1934 (the same year Cole Porter’s “You’re The Top” appeared on Broadway in Anything Goes...not for long it wouldn't!), everyone was obliged to reshape their cartoon series and other projects into more family-friendly fare.
Walt Disney was the most successful in making this transition, doing so by targeting young children quite specifically. In 1934 he announced a new project that would retell the classic children's tale, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs as a feature length animated film designed especially for kids, a daring proposition that turned its back on the winning formula of short cartoons for general motion picture audiences, and industry pundits dubbed it "Disney's Folly". Released in 1937, Snow White was a smash hit critically and financially and ushered in a veritable Golden Age of animation. Other studios attempted to emulate Snow White’s success (Fleischer’s 1939 Gulliver’s Travels and 1941 Raggedy Anne and Raggedy Andy, etc.), but Disney essentially owned the form for the next 20 years, resulting in such children's stories (some original, most adaptations of classics) as Pinocchio (1940), Cinderella (1950), Alice In Wonderland (1951), Peter Pan (1953), and The Jungle Book (1967) among many others.
Brilliantly conceived and executed Snow White and the entire Disney feature-length output also contained another innovation: full, original scores. Which meant great new melodies in the ears of America, and a great new source of material for performer and jazz musician alike. Many of these songs became outright jazz standards. For this evening’s concert, Ken has worked up a fine selection of the best of these songs, focusing (consistent with our festival theme!) on the shows that were based on classic children's fairy tales and literature.
Event Personnel
Ken Peplowski, director, clarinet
Julie Alsin, vocals
Clairdee, vocals
Bob Cross, vocals
Ian Whitcomb, vocals, ukulele
Dan Barrett, trombone
Rod Fleeman, guitar
Doug Miller, bass
Chuck Redd, drums
Program
 When You Wish Upon A Star
(1940) Pinocchio
Words by Ned Washington - Music by Leigh Harline
 Whistle While You Work
(1937) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Words by Larry Morey - Music by Frank Churchill
 With A Smile And A Song
(1937) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Words by Larry Morey - Music by Frank Churchill
 Who's Afraid Of The Big Bad Wolf
(1933) Three Little Pigs
Words by Ann Ronell - Music by Frank Churchill
 Some Day My Prince Will Come
(1937) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Words by Larry Morey - Music by Frank Churchill
 The Second Star To The Right
(1953) Peter Pan
Words by Sammy Cahn - Music by Sammy Fain
 A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes
(1950) Cinderella
Words & music by Mack David, Al Hoffman, Jerry Livingston
 I Wan'na Be Like You
(1967) The Jungle Book
Words & music by Richard Sherman, Robert Sherman
I'm Wishing
(1937) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Words by Larry Morey - Music by Frank Churchill
 One Song
(1937) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Words by Larry Morey - Music by Frank Churchill
 Alice In Wonderland
(1951) Alice In Wonderland
Words by Bob Hilliard - Music by Sammy Fain
 I'm Late
(1951) Alice In Wonderland
Words by Bob Hilliard - Music by Sammy Fain
 Give A Little Whistle
(1940) Pinocchio
Words by Ned Washington - Music by Leigh Harline
Featured composers, lyricists, creators
Sammy Cahn, 1913-1993
Frank Churchill, -
Mack David, 1912-1993
Sammy Fain, 1902-1989
Leigh Harline, -
Bob Hilliard, -
Al Hoffman, 1902-1960
Jerry Livingston, 1909-1987
Larry Morey, -
Ann Ronell, 1908-1993
Richard Sherman, -
Robert Sherman, -
Ned Washington, 1901-1976
Ticket/Venue Info
When You Wish Upon A Star Ticket Prices
Seat LvlFull PriceDiscount Prices
15%  20%  25%  Stud. 
AA28.00  24.00  22.50  21.00  14.00 
A24.00  20.50  19.25  18.00  12.00 
B20.00  17.00  16.00  15.00  10.00 
O16.00  13.75  13.00  12.00  8.00 
Jaqua Concert Hall
The John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts
285 E Broadway
Eugene, Oregon
541-434-7000

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541.434.7000
Brush Up Your Shakespeare Musical Overview
Brush Up Your Shakespeare Schedule
Wednesday Jul 28
8:00 pmSwingin' The Dream
Thursday Jul 29
2:00 pmWhy Can't You Behave?
8:00 pmMan Bites Dog
Friday Jul 30
2:00 pmThe Rain In Spain
Saturday Jul 31
8:00 pmSuch Sweet Thunder
Thursday Aug 5
2:00 pmWhere Did Robinson Crusoe Go
8:00 pmWhen You Wish Upon A Star
Friday Aug 6
2:00 pmSomewhere
Saturday Aug 7
8:00 pmI Could Write A Book
The John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts (The Shedd)
E. Broadway & High Street, Eugene | PO Box 1497, Eugene OR 97440-1497 | Phone 541.687.6526 | Tickets: 541.434.7000 | Email: info@theshedd.net
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